SCHEDULE AN APPOINTMENT

PRICES

PEOPLE

APPRENTICE SERVICES

PARTNERSHIPS

PIANO CARE

CUSTOMERS

REVIEWS

CONTACT

SCHEDULE AN
APPOINTMENT


PIANO SHOP

PRICES

JEROME ELLIS - (New York)
(level purple)

TOM ERICKSON - (New York)
(level copper)

Tuning - $80
Pitch Raise - $20
Repairs - $60/hr

Tuning - $130
Pitch Raise - $40
Repairs - $100/hr

MACHO MAK - (Hong Kong)
(level purple)

NEWAY LAU - (Hong Kong)
(level purple)

Tuning - 350 HKD
Pitch Raise - 125 HKD
Repairs - 175 HKD/hr

Tuning - 350 HKD
Pitch Raise - 125 HKD
Repairs - 175 HKD/hr

BIMOL KARMAKER - (New York)
(level copper)

DANIEL DIMAGGIO - (New York)
(level copper)

Tuning - $130
Pitch Raise - $40
Repairs - $100/hr

Tuning - $130
Pitch Raise - $40
Repairs - $100/hr

EATHAN JANNEY
(lead technician / owner)

Tuning - $185
Pitch Raise - $65
Repairs - $140/hr
Regulation - $500-$3000

DEFINITIONS

TUNING

Piano tuning involves two major activities. One is determining the fundamental frequency with which each note on a piano ought to vibrate so as to be perceived as pleasing in the context of the other notes of the instrument. The second is the adjustment of each string so each will ring at its desired frequency. The adjustment is achieved by turning tuning pins which the strings wrap around and making sure the strings and pins are stabilized in the proper position. The pins sit snugly in a block of maple and are turned using a special tool called a tuning hammer or tuning wrench. Turning a tuning pin changes the tension of the string which changes the frequency at which the string vibrates.

A piano that is in tune sounds richer and fuller. This is because the strings are vibrating at frequencies that interact in a way that is pleasing to the ear. There are several signs that a tuning is needed. One, a note may sound out of tune when played alone. Two, intervals or chords may sound bad when notes are played together. Three, a piano may sound adequately "in tune with itself" yet be flat or sharp from standard pitch. In this case you might play along with another instrument and find that things sound awkward.

A tuning every six months is recommended to ensure a home piano is relatively in tune all year round.

return to top

PITCH RAISE

A pitch raise is a rough tuning, which generally takes less than a half an hour. We call it a pitch raise because one must raise the pitch of each string about 25 to 30 percent as sharp beyond concert pitch as it was flat. By the time the pitch raise process is completed, the strings have fallen back to approximately concert pitch and a fine tuning can successfully be achieved.

A pitch raise or pitch adjustment is needed when, in order to achieve the desired tuning, a great shift in tension across all the strings of the piano is required. All of the strings of the piano are exerting pressure on a large piece of eighth inch thick wood called the sound board through contact with another piece of wood called the bridge. As the tension on each string is increased the tension on the others is decreased. We can only predict the subsequent decrease in tension within a certain range, therefore a fine tuning must follow a pitch raise. A pitch raise will be needed if your piano has not been tuned for more than a year or is extremely flat or sharp.

If the instrument is tuned regularly (about every six months) it may never require a pitch raise. If it has been a long time you should expect that one will be needed. We will let you know ahead of time if we conclude that one will be necessary.

return to top

REPAIRS

Repairs, which are different from regulation, are less common and usually involve some glue, specialt tools and parts or standard tools such as wrenches, drills, screws, nuts and bolts. Repairs vary and it is often unpredictable what may need repair. Some examples of repair include the replacement or repair of a missing or broken action part or string. An extreme or unusual repair might require some improvisation. We are generally happy to explain repairs in great detail and welcome questions and even suggestions if you are inclined to make them. The goal is to make the best possible repair with the resources at hand and ensure that you understand the process as thoroughly as you desire. Our policy is to notify customers of repairs before we make them so that there are no surprises. It is always up to the customer's discretion as to whether we perform a specific repair or not.

return to top

REGULATION

Regulation, or adjustment of the action mechanisms of the piano can be done on an upright or grand, but the action regulation of a grand involves a bit more. There are many mechanical parts that are integral to what happens as you press down a piano key. These parts can get out of alignment due to wear, changes in humidity, or compression of felt parts. Sometimes a simple adjustment can solve a single problem. Adjustment of the capstan screws might be an example that sometimes solves double striking. That might only take a half hour and is not considered a full regulation.

A full regulation is a step by step procedure and can take many hours. It involves ensuring that every action mechanism that can be adjusted is in the ideal alignment. Since the parts of the piano work as a system of interdependent mechanisms, adjustment of one part will affect the others. A formal, step by step process of regulation ensures that the adjustment of one function to its proper alignment is not affecting the capacity of another function.

If regulation is needed, one will notice that the action doesn't "feel right," or respond well when playing. In more obvious cases, a key or two may not function. The key may stick, or the hammer might double strike the string, or you might press down the key and the note does not sound.

Many sources recommend a full regulation every four years or so. Minor regulation procedures may be sufficient to address a minor problem these may be necessary from season to season as humidity affects the action.

return to top